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Rosebud News

SOUTH DAKOTA US ATTORNEY INITIATES 'COMMUNITY PROSECUTION STRATEGY'

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By Andrew Ramonas
MAIN JUSTICE REPORT

ROSEBUD — The South Dakota U.S. Attorney’s Office will revitalize its efforts to address Indian Country public safety through a new outreach plan intended to reduce the staggering crime levels in local tribal communities, the state’s top federal prosecutor announced last month.

U.S. Attorney Brendan Johnson, who has led the Sioux Falls-based office since
October, said he will launch a two-year pilot program this fall that will put a federal prosecutor on a South Dakota reservation at least three days a week.

Update: CONTROVERSY OVER SEVERE BEATING IN PARMELEE

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By PR Gregg-Bear
PARMELEE —  An extreme beating incident here involving three young men, an alleged abduction, and Rosebud police, has the RST Council, the Bordeaux administration, and angry parents in an uproar.

Officials spent most of Monday in executive session with police, members of the police commission, and parents, where emotions were reportedly expressed, resulting at one point with Police Chief Grace Her Many Horses seen leaving the meeting in tears, according to sources.

SOUTH DAKOTA DISTRICT COURT

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St. Francis Man Charged with Armed Robbery
U.S. Attorney Brendan Johnson has announced that a St. Francis, South Dakota, man has been indicted by a federal grand jury for Robbery.
Thomas M. White, 22, was indicted by a federal grand jury on January 12, 2010, for Robbery.
He appeared before Judge Mark A. Moreno on February 12, 2010, and pleaded not guilty to the indictment.
The maximum penalty upon conviction is 15 years in custody, a $250,000 fine, or both; 3 years of supervised release; and a $100 special assessment.

COBELL LAWSUIT SETTLEMENT DEFENDED; CONGRESS DECIDING WHETHER TO PAY

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By Ledyard King
WASHINGTON — Barack Obama administration officials Wednesday vigorously defended the $3.4 billion settlement of a class-action lawsuit over the long-standing federal mismanagement of Indian tribal trusts, countering criticisms of exorbitant lawyers' fees, meager payouts to victims and a lack of overall transparency.

"We feel this settlement is fair and appropriate," David Hayes, deputy Interior secretary, told members of the House Natural Resources Committee. "We want to close the book and look ahead."

FORMER CHAIRMAN CALLS FOR UNITY IN FACE OF HIGH SUICIDE RATE AMONG REZ YOUTH

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By Ronald His Horse is Thunder

My name is Ron His Horse is Thunder and I am the great-great grandson of One Bull, the nephew and adopted son of Sitting Bull, our Hunkpapa Lakota Nation Chief.

All of my life, I have tried to walk the good Red Road and serve my people. Tunkasila, Grandfather, has a plan for all of us.
The Justice Department cannot be entrusted with BIA Law Enforcement. The downside is too steep.

LAWSUIT ARGUES FOR RELEASE OF $1 BILLION BLACK HILLS MONEY

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ROSEBUD — Members of eight Lakota/Dakota tribes should be given their fair share of nearly $1 billion awarded in an old court case for the improper taking of the Black Hills, according to a lawsuit filed in federal court in Sioux Falls.

Even though the tribes have refused award money and have continued to demand return of land in western South Dakota, the courts cannot give back land, the lawsuit says.

COST OVERRUNS, BOARD FIRINGS CONTRIBUTE TO DELAY IN STORE'S GRAND OPENING

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MISSION — The opening of a new tribally-owned grocery store in Mission has been delayed again until May, amid rising costs and a development board shake-up and firings.

The $8.1 million price tag of the Turtle Creek Crossing grocery store — which is owned by the tribe's Rosebud Economic Development Corporation — has risen more than $2 million since its anticipated grand opening late last year, according to Rodney Bordeaux, president of the Rosebud Sioux Tribe.

CUSTOMERS TO CONTINUE PAYING HIGHER RATE PENDING 30-DAY REVIEW

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By Vi Waln
Sun Times Correspondent
ROSEBUD — RST’s Tribal Utilities Commission (TUC) has directed three attorneys to research the relationship between the tribe and Cherry-Todd Electric Cooperative Inc., and to bring the information back to the commission.

In short, does the tribe have authority to regulate the cost of electricity to its members living on tribal land?

CHERRY-TODD ELECTRIC ORDERED TO HALT 22 PERCENT RATE HIKE

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By PR Gregg-Bear
ROSEBUD — No sooner had newspapers hit newsstands last week than a call for an injunction went out against Cherry-Todd Electric Cooperative from RST Council chambers.

The purpose of the injunction was to stop Cherry-Todd from raising its rates “on average of 22 percent” over the present rate — which some people had already started paying.

A hearing date with the tribe’s utilities commission has been set for March 6.

RST COUNCIL ORDERS NEW ELECTION FOR ROSEBUD COMMUNITY

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By Sun Times Staff
ROSEBUD — A special election for Rosebud Community was held here Jan. 26, and while its intent was to solve a glaring problem, it may have created untenable ones of its own.

Like a hammer hitting wood, the RST Council approved a motion by Rep. William Long Thursday that wipes out the special election and sets a 45-day limit on holding another one for Rosebud Community; to be held March 27, a Friday.

The move to a do-over was approved in a vote of 11 in favor, 3 opposed, and 2 not voting.

COMMUNITY CHAIR GETS BOOT FROM RST COUNCIL FOR ABRIDGING MEMBERS' RIGHTS

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By Rodney Bordeaux
RST President

On December 30, 2008, the Rosebud Sioux Tribe enacted RST 08-308, removing and publicly censuring Todd C. Fast Horse as community chairperson of Rosebud Community.

COMMUNITY CHAIRMAN HOPES FOR WIN IN COUNCIL HEARING

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ROSEBUD — So far, two attempts by the RST Council to hold a hearing on Rosebud’s community chairman have failed due to lack of quorum. A third attempt has not been set, though it is expected to be held in November.

Chairman Todd Fast Horse is prepared and ready to fight for his position, lugging an armful of books and wearing a black tie to the hearing that never was.

Technically, the RST Council has fired Fast Horse, approving a motion by Rep. William Long to that effect, arguing that Fast Horse violated some community members’ civil rights.

TRIBAL EQUITY BLOWIN' IN THE WIND WITH US GOVERNMENT

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By Robert Gough
Last week, The New York Times covered two stories outlining the need of two American governments to acquire equity in contemporary economic development enterprises: One was about the federal government’s response to the need for equity in $700 billion national bank bailout and the other was about a tribal government’s response to the lack of equity in $58.6 million wind project on an Indian reservation.

OBAMA PROMISES TRIBES A CLOSER RELATIONSHIP IN THE WHITE HOUSE

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ALBUQUERQUE, NM — At a gathering of more than 100 Native American tribal leaders, Miko Beasley Denson, Chief of the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians, and Democrat presidential nominee Sen. Barack Obama discussed the federal government's role in the economic development of American tribes, Denson's office said.

Representatives from dozens of tribes were on hand last month at the All Indian Pueblo Center in Albuquerque, N.M., to meet with the Senator.

Obama described the meeting as "extraordinary," according to Denson's office.

ROSEBUD YOUTH FINDS MEANING IN JOB CORPS WORK ETHIC PROGRAM

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By Jodi Rave RONAN, Mont. — Jathan Jones revels in the campus life at Kicking Horse Job Corps Center, nestled as it is amid postcard-perfect scenery in the foothills of the Mission Mountains, offering vocational training in 11 job skill areas.

“We're spoiled here,” said Jones, a 19-year-old medical assistant student. “We get so many opportunities to do things. The food is great and the view is beautiful.”

WHY ARE LAKOTA YOUNG PEOPLE KILLING THEMSELVES? Part 2

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By Steve Young
MISSION — Two years after her son ended his life, Kathleen Wooden Knife finally has a reason to wipe away the tears.

A month ago, the resource development director for the Rosebud Sioux Tribe learned that a grant application she wrote had secured more than $477,000 from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration to help prevent suicides on her reservation.

WHY ARE LAKOTA YOUNG PEOPLE KILLING THEMSELVES? Part 1

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By Steve Young
MISSION — In the hospital that evening, sobbing, wracked by despair, Marie Wilcox cried out in the sorrow of a mother and a nation.

Hours earlier, she had returned to her trailer east of Mission to find her 18-year-old son, Stoney Larvie, hanging from the rafters on their deck with a dog leash around his neck.

Now in the emergency room in Rosebud, an inconsolable Wilcox lashed out as she tried to fix blame for her loss and find answers for an act she never saw coming.

FAST HORSE WINS REELECTION DESPITE CONTROVERSY

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By PR Gregg-Bear
ROSEBUD — A predicted larger than normal turnout packed the community building last week for the annual election of officers.

Of the 109 people who signed in Sept. 3, more than 60 voted to reelect community chairman, Todd Fast Horse.

Robert LaPointe, the only other candidate nominated for chairman before nominations were quickly halted, received nearly 40 votes.

ROSEBUD RECEIVES NEARLY HALF-MILLION TO ADDRESS SUICIDE PROBLEM

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WASHINGTON — The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration ( SAMHSA ) today announced the award of 12 grants totaling more than $16 million over three years to support suicide prevention efforts undertaken by tribes/tribal organizations.

This grant program is authorized under the Garrett Lee Smith Memorial Act, which provides funding for programs to combat suicide.

JANKLOW ADJUSTING AS FAMILY MARKS FIVE YEARS SINCE SON'S DEATH

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By Joe Kafka
FLANDREAU — Five years after a fatal crash that ended a remarkable political career and reshaped South Dakota's political landscape, Bill Janklow is adjusting to private life and has resumed lawyering.

Janklow, a former state attorney general, South Dakota's only four-term governor and a first-term congressman, fell from grace Aug. 16, 2003, when he ran a stop sign 10 miles south of Flandreau and killed motorcyclist Randy Scott of Hardwick, Minn.

Janklow, 68, says he has resumed a normal life and regrets the accident.

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