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COALITION OBJECTS TO REPUBLICAN AMENDMENT OPPOSING OBAMA'S USE OF ANTIQUITIES ACT

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STATEMENT

Bears Ears Intertribal Coalition

Introduction by Natasha Hale, Bears Ears Press

MAJORITY OF OUR KIDS LACK PROPER EDUCATION ON CLIMATE CHANGE

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EDUCATION

By Suzanne Goldenberg

Most kids in the U.S. are taught lessons on climate change that do not rise to the level of a sound science education, according to new research.

A survey of 1,500 teachers found most pupils spend only an hour or two in an academic year learning about climate change in middle and high school—and much of what they are taught is confusing or simply wrong. 

INTERIOR, JUSTICE AND HHS ANNOUNCE BIA MODEL INDIAN JUVENILE CODE

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JUVENILE JUSTICE

From Staff Reports

WASHINGTON—Furthering President Obama’s efforts to support American Indian families and protect tribal communities, Assistant Secretary Indian Affairs Lawrence Roberts has announced a proposed BIA Model Indian Juvenile Code.

Officials are seeking public comment on the draft, which will be the subject of listening and consultation sessions scheduled for March and April 2016.

HUD AWARDS $1.1 MILLION FOR AFFORDABLE TRIBAL HOUSING IN SOUTH DAKOTA

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HOUSING

From Staff Reports 

PINE RIDGE—HUD has announced it will give $1.1 million in an Indian block grant to the Oglala Sioux Tribe to help improve housing conditions, and stimulate community development on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation.

The first-of-the-year in housing funds—from a competitive block grant system, won by a single tribe—will help Pine Ridge start new construction projects, and provide vitally needed jobs on a reservation known nationally for its poverty-stricken families.

LARGER EARTHQUAKES POINT TO MAN-MADE CAUSE AFFECTING THE ENTIRE MIDWEST

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ENVIRONMENT

From Staff Reports

OKLAHOMA CITY—A 5.1 magnitude earthquake shook northwestern Oklahoma recently, an event the U.S. Geological Survey said should trouble wastewater injection companies.

The USGS said the earthquake could have been caused by wastewater injection, which can involve taking water used in fracking and injecting it into underground wells, ostensibly to not contaminate more drinking water.

FLANDREAU SANTEES RACE TO BE FIRST TO BEGIN SELLING PEJI FOR PROFIT

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NEW BUSINESS

From Staff Reports

FLANDREAU — Members of Flandreau Santee Sioux Tribe are looking to be first of South Dakota’s nine Indian tribes to begin actively selling peji on their reservation by Christmas 2015.

To some tribal politicians, the notion long perpetrated by the U.S. government that peji or marijuana is an evil drug, remains embedded in their mindset, despite it now being legal in several states.

TRIBAL GOVERNMENTS ABLE TO TAKE CRIMINAL ACTION AGAINST NON-INDIANS

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ROSEBUD — As of March 7, tribal government may begin exercising jurisdiction over non-Indians who commit crimes of domestic violence, dating violence, or violate a protection order against an Indian victim on tribal lands.

“This is a major step forward to protect the safety of native people, and we thank all members of Congress for passing the Violence Against Women Act of 2013, and recognizing tribal authority,” said Brian Cladoosby, president of NCAI.

ROSEBUD MAN FOUND NOT GUILTY OF SEXUAL ABUSE IN FEDERAL COURT

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IN FEDERAL COURT

Anthony Fast Horse, 55, Rosebud, has been found not guilty of Sexual Abuse following a jury trial in Pierre.

The verdict was reached on Feb. 11. Fast Horse was indicted on Mar. 13, 2012, for allegedly sexually abusing the victim in Rosebud.

The investigation was conducted by FBI and the U.S. Attorney’s Office prosecuted the case.

Fast Horse was released from custody.

 

REPORTERS, ACTIVISTS DEMAND RELEASE OF FORMER JUDGE'S 'RACIST' EMAILS

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From Staff Reports

HELENA, Mont. — A nonprofit Indian activist group, engaged in voting rights issues, has joined with investigative reporters and others in calling for the public release of "racist" emails sent by a former federal judge who made critical rulings in cases involving minorities.

“Former 9th District Circuit Court Judge Richard Cebull sent hundreds of bigoted emails from his federal computer before 2013, and the public has a right to review them now,” demanded Oliver J. Semans, director of Four Directions in Mission, S.D. 

SUCIDE AMONG NATIVE YOUTH CONTINUES TO BE A MAJOR PROBLEM

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INDIAN COUNTRY

By Sari Horwitz 

SACATON, Ariz. — The tamarisk tree down the dirt road from Tyler Owens’s house is the one where the teenage girl who lived across the road hanged herself.

“Don’t climb it, don’t touch it,” admonished Owens’s grandmother when Tyler, now 18, was younger.

There are other taboo markers around the Gila River Indian reservation—eight young people committed suicide here over the course of a single year.

HIGH PERCENTAGE OF MILITARY VETS CONSIDER SUICIDE AN OPTION

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From Staff Reports

Some 2,000 combat vets surveyed by Iraq & Afghanistan Veterans of America (IAVA) reported “crisis with suicide” as their number one concern.

Nearly half of all veterans who served in Iraq or Afghanistan know at least one who attempted suicide, and 40 percent know someone who did.

The largest survey of Iraq and Afghanistan veterans found much has improved in America’s care of veterans. Yet there are plenty of challenges and notable gaps in data nationwide.

PROTESTERS DEMAND IMMEDIATE JUSTICE AFTER POLICE GUN DOWN FENCED DOG

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Hundreds of people gathered in the streets of Salt Lake City to protest what they called an unnecessary shooting by police, and demanding immediate justice for the victim—a 110-pound dog named “Geist.”

The gray dog was in the backyard, secured behind a fence, when he was killed by a police officer searching for a missing boy. Police said dog was shot when he rose in an “aggressive manner” as officer entered dog's fenced-in area. The boy soon after was found at home asleep.

OGLALA COUNCIL SUSPENDS PRESIDENT BREWER OVER ALLEGATIONS HE ABUSED HIS AUTHORITY

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From Staff Reports

PINE RIDGE — The OST Council's recent decision to abruptly suspend popular President Bryan Brewer stems partly from the president's dealings with tribal businessman Raycen Raines, which enraged many council members, according to sources.

After suspending him, the council immediately approved a resolution saying Brewer had no authority to let Raines act on behalf of the tribe in federal negotiations.

XL SOUTHERN PIPELINE ALREADY EXHIBITING WORRISOME FLAWS

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PIERRE — Federal regulators have placed two extra restrictions on TransCanada’s Keystone XL pipeline after learning of potentially dangerous construction defects on the southern leg of the Canada-to-Texas project.

The northern leg, which is being lobbied hard by Koch Industries and the political right, is planned for North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska and other states, despite stiff opposition from Indian tribes, farmers and ranchers, especially along the Ogallala Aquifer.

PARENTS OF MISSING SICANGU TEEN FEAR FOUL PLAY

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By Gregg Bear

ALPINE, Utah — The frightened parents of a missing 16-year-old Sicangu girl are desperately searching for their daughter, who mysteriously disappeared last week.

The family of Indica Huddleston, 16, have launched their own full scale investigation into their missing teen, who vanished without her ever-present cellphone or money.

After finding a cryptic note she left behind, her parents, Bryan and Andrea Huddleston, suspect she may have been seduced away by a man she met online.

SUICIDE RATE AMONG OLDER NATIVE AMERICANS JUMPS DRAMATICALLY

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From Staff Reports

ROSEBUD — Among non-Hispanic whites and Native Americans, annual suicide rates have jumped 40 percent and 65 percent, respectively, according to government reports.

Suicide rates are rising dramatically among middle-aged and older Americans, according to U.S. government statistics, which showed a 28 percent spike from a decade ago.

The CDC said figures show more people are committing suicide than dying in car accidents, and attribute the increase to adults aged 35 to 64.

OST DEMANDS OBAMA QUICKLY SUPPLY FUNDING FOR LANGUAGE EDUCATION

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PINE RIDGE — Oglala Tribal President Bryan Brewer has demanded that President Barack Obama immediately fulfill his campaign promise to push forward Indian education and immersion language strategies.

In a recent letter to President Obama, Brewer exhorted the White House take action without delay.

OBAMA LIMITS 2014 INDIAN AFFAIRS BUDGET, WHILE ATTEMPTING TO STRENGTHEN, SUPPORT TRIBES

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WASHINGTON — President Obama’s FY-2014 budget request for Indian Affairs, which includes BIA and BIE, is $2.6 billion—representing a mere $31.3 million increase over last year.

The proposed budget is aimed at attempting to meet government’s responsibilities to tribes, while exercising tough fiscal responsibility, and striving to improve operations and efficiency.

The White House hopes a limited budget with cuts will assure congressional approval in the face of unswerving political opposition to new spending in the Republican House.

HIGH COST OF EQUALITY REFLECTED IN CONTINUING FIGHT FOR VOTING RIGHTS

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MISSOULA, Mont. — “Everyone talks about rights, but they have a cost,” said opposition attorney Sara Frankenstein, who represents Montana state and county defendants in the federal voting-rights case, Wandering Medicine v. McCulloch.

For expense reasons, Montana Indians shouldn’t expect counties to spend money providing early-voting satellite offices, she said.

“We all can’t have everything we want,” chided Frankenstein (real name), who also represents two South Dakota counties in a similar case brought by members of the Oglala Sioux Tribe.

STANLEY CROOKS: INFLUENTIAL TRIBAL LEADER KNOWN FOR HIS GREAT GENEROSITY AT SHAKOPEE

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PRIOR LAKE — Stanley R. Crooks, leader of the Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Community, one of the nation's wealthiest and most influential American Indian tribes, died of natural causes Aug. 25. He was 70.

For more than 20 years, Crooks led the 480-member tribe, which owns and operates the highly lucrative Mystic Lake Casino Hotel in Prior Lake, and served as a national figurehead for tribal sovereignty.

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